• Age grade calculator - how fast are you when you take age and gender out of the picture? (literally, the open men's division equivalent of your finish time. Anything over 60% means you're pretty good. 70% means you probably win your age group a lot. 80% means you could compete on the regional or national level. 90% means you're world class.  Here's another version of the calculator.     
     
  • Treadmill Pace Converter - we all know that running on a treadmill is easier than running outside. But how much easier? This converter lets you see what your treadmill pace / incline is equivalent to in the real world.
     
  • Even Better Treadmill Pace Converter - input distance, time, speed, incline, etc, and it tells you what you would have done on flat ground. Note that unless you are a highly trained hill runner, you won't be able to achieve that flat-ground equivalents that you would expect.
     
  • Benchmark CrossFit WODs - Fran, Murph, Jackie, Josh... how many do you know? Here's all them, just waiting for you to give them a shot. Yeah, a lot of these are fun benchmark fitness tests, but not always the most productive use of training time when it comes to getting stronger and faster. I admit though, I'm often guilty of giving some random WODs a shot to see how I compare to Froning ;)
     
  • Race Time Predictor - did you recently run a 5k and want to know how fast you'd run a half-marathon? This calculator does just that. It's actually a pretty simple formula... t2/t1 = (d2/d1)^1.06.  Just plug in the numbers on the site and it will give you an estimate. Is it a good estimate? Well, this estimate assumes that you are a runner with a high degree of aerobic conditioning. Unless you're an elite runner, it's more likely that your exponent will be closer to 1.1, even higher if you're a clydesdale runner. Some powerlifters and strongmen, even with cardio training, have exponential slowdowns of 1.25. That said, if you know your time for two different races, you can work out the math and figure out what that number is for you. It probably won't be 1.06. 
     
  • VDOT Training Pace Calculator - this calculator uses a recent race performance to determine what your training paces should be for various intensities. Useful for determining what your "easy pace" really is. 
     
  • McMillan Running: Race Time Predictor and Training Paces Calculator - this version is more detailed than the above two links and very useful! I find these paces to be spot on for determining what paces runners should be running for various workout distances / intensities. It needs some adjustment for other athletes (like weightlifters training for a 10k).
     
  • Running Warehouse - I'm convinced this is the best place to order running gear. No, I don't work for them or anything... just passing along my favorite store to you. I mainly love them because of free 2-day shipping and free returns.
     
  • Rogue Fitness - Just as running warehouse is my favorite place for running gear, rogue is my go to brand for high quality, american made strength equipment. It can be pricey, but in most cases I think it's worth it. Feel free to reach out to me for specific recommendations on gear, apparel, etc.
     
  • Clever Training - clever training isn't normally the first place I look for gear, but they often carry some cool new stuff that other sites don't. So if you're ever in that "I want to spend money but I'm not sure what I want", check out clever training for some ideas.
     
  • DC Rainmaker - I get asked all the time about the the latest GPS watches and other wearable tech. I'm happy to provide general recommendations, troubleshooting, etc to my athletes, but if you're looking for the nitty gritty details and insanely in-depth reviews of pretty much every device out there...look no further. Plus, he has a 10% off code for clever training buried in his website somewhere. Win!
     
  • The Hybrid Athlete - insanely awesome book by Alex Viada, creator of the hybrid athlete methodology taught in his CHP certification course. Absolutely invaluable information for anyone looking to simultaneously compete in strength sports and endurance sports.
     
  • Find My Marathon - if you're a marathon runner, this is pretty much the coolest website ever. Using weather data, elevation profiles, and other course information, this resource will convert your marathon time at one race to another. So if you ran a 3:02:30 at the Atlanta Marathon, it can tell you what you'll run the Boston Marathon in. It also has a cool pacing guide that takes elevation data and pacing strategy into account, rather than just spitting out even mile splits to follow. Very cool!
     
  • Maximum Performance Running - this blog has some really great training advice for endurance athletes. It's geared towards marathon runners, but I think anyone can learn from the information here. Specifically, I like what he has to say about stress workouts vs. recovery workouts.
     
  • Using Lanes Other Than Lane 1 on the Track - like most runners, I naturally gravitate towards running in lane 1 when doing speed work on the track; the math is simple; 1 lap = 400m. But, running on the inside lane places more stress on the joints and is likely to cause injury if you run great distances on the track. I've lately been doing some marathon pace long runs the track and wanted to know exactly how many laps I needed to run in outer lanes, instead of relying on my Garmin. This calculator makes it simple. A conversion I like to remember: 12 laps in lane 3 is a 5k.